Media

Media


Insane Sutherland Shire mansion with bowling alley and 23 bathrooms to shatter records :

“Nautilus” in Burraneer is unlike anything ever seen before in Australia. One of the most significant homes ever built in Sydney and Australia is set to come to market next week.

The palatial trophy home at Burraneer in the Sutherland Shire is simply epic, with 3200sqm of internal space across six floors — three of which are below ground.

Being marketed as “Australia’s finest house”, the property is owned by entrepreneur Steve Shelley, who purchased three adjoining homes and spent a reported $30 million over four years to build the masterpiece.

And Mr Shelley, who was best known as the founder of software start-up Deputy, has not wasted one inch of the 3200sqm inside, with there being seven bedrooms, six kitchens, 23 bathrooms, a theatre, wine tasting room, bowling alley and a “bat cave”.

Named after the seashell — Nautilus also has two bars, three commercial lifts, a 20 car garage, music room, swimming pool, private beach and marina.

So it won’t surprise anyone that the property overlooking Burraneer Bay comes with pricing expectations of over $50 million.

Highland Property Group’s managing director David Highland said while there was no formal guide, he would instead be quoting “over $50 million” based on replacement costs.

This would easily break many property records including the $11 million Sutherland Shire high set in 2018 by a Kangaroo Point mansion and the Burraneer benchmark recorded last year following the $9.1 million sale of 191 Woolooware Rd.

It would also be higher than the $24.5 million northern beaches record after Jennifer Hawkins sold her Newport residence to Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes, and the $25 million Mosman benchmark held by Sydney Swans chairman Andrew Pridham.

It would also be higher than the $24.5 million northern beaches record after Jennifer Hawkins sold her Newport residence to Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes, and the $25 million Mosman benchmark held by Sydney Swans chairman Andrew Pridham.

Mr Highland said Nautilus was without doubt one of the best homes to have ever been offered to the market. “There is nothing else like this in Sydney and even Australia — it is a never to be repeated opportunity,” he said. “

“The level of finish seen throughout is like nothing that I have seen before.” Mr Shelley enlisted Sammut Developments to build a property that he wanted to be “Australia’s best house”.

A total of 750 tradespeople worked on Nautilus over the four year construction period, which saw 2300 cubic metres of concrete used, reinforced by 300 tonnes of steel.

There is also a 8m deep 15m long tunnel dubbed the “bat cave” that allows the beach to be accessed without the use of stairs. Mr Highland said the most impressive feature was that despite its scale it still felt subtle and understated.

“The design took into consideration its surroundings as to not look out of place,” he said. “It is very proportioned in that despite its size, it is still very easy to live in.”

Sammut also carried out the landscaping work including the restoration of a heritage listed boat shed and the demolition of a harbour pool to build the beach.

The property has two guest pavilions, a bowling alley with two lanes and a wine cellar that looks like Dan Murphy’s.

The finished product resulted in the Housing Industry Association awarding Nautilus the Australian Home of the Year, and the People’s Choice award in 2016.

Mr Highland is expecting strong interest from buyers based in the Shire, as well as from Sydney and expats returning home. “There is a lot on depth in the local Sutherland Shire market for homes of this standard,” he said.